Understanding Human Centered Design (6 Part Series)

Understanding Human Centered Design (6 Part Series)

People often have a tendency of identifying key problems in our community and then start generating solutions immediately without much consideration of the actual people the issues affect in the first place.

Human-centered design is an approach to solving complex problems through innovation by focusing on people. Utilizing design thinking strategies and other tools, a team comes together believing they can make a difference. They use an intentional process to explore new, relevant solutions that produce positive change. This intentional process includes two key elements.

  • HUMAN-CENTERED - The process centers on gaining insights from observing and engaging with people and developing empathy related to understanding their needs, motivations, and behavior.

  • DESIGN - Having the freedom to dream about, generate, and explore NEW solutions, and then testing those solutions out (over and over again) with community members.

This post is the first of a series dedicated to helping readers understand design thinking (or human centered design) and its application through the United Way Hub for Social Innovation.

Lessons on Collaboration from The Beautiful Game

Lessons on Collaboration from The Beautiful Game

Team sports offer a unique opportunity to observe how people can come together to achieve a collective goal. Just for kicks (sorry, I had to), let’s explore what the beautiful game (i.e. futbol…err soccer) can teach us about collaboration. How might we gain some insight that we can implement in our community’s work to put one in the back of the [social change for good] net.

Design Thinking for Social Innovation

Design Thinking for Social Innovation

Designers have traditionally focused on enhancing the look and functionality of products. Recently, they have begun using design techniques to tackle more complex problems, such as finding ways to provide low-cost healthcare throughout the world. Businesses were the first to embrace this new approach—called design thinking—and nonprofits are beginning to adopt it too. // A repost from the Stanford Social Innovation Review.

Be Free to Innovate

Be Free to Innovate

How often do those of us in the social sector fear change? We spend years building services and programs that we feel make a significant difference in the lives of others. And then we continue doing those same services year after year after year. Perhaps it’s time to get creative and try something new. The United Way Hub for Social Innovation is your opportunity to do just that.